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6 Inspiring Messages from Female CrossFit Athletes for everyone that Struggles with their Body Image

"Bodies defined by what they can do, not by how they look." Camille Leblanc Bazinet.

CrossFit is an exceptionally powerful force for driving a positive shift towards body image, for men and women, being viewed in a more constructive way. Namely that performance comes first. Despite that ideal, we all have insecurities, so here are 6 great messages from top female CrossFit Athletes to put the theory into practice in their own unique way. 

Lauren Fisher

“Hey. I’m not perfect and neither are you.

Yesterday I posted in my stories how someone called me bloated in one of my last posts and to be honest that same weekend I was also on my period. Sorry guys for the TMI.

A woman’s body goes through so many weight fluctuations throughout her cycle and it is 100% normal. It makes me so sad that people still have to revert to negativity in a world right now where we need more positivity.

And you know what this isn’t the only one of so many I receive critiquing my body image on the daily. If you are new here, I’m going to be 100% real with you. I use my platform and Grown Strong to promote body confidence, body acceptance and promote women supporting women throughout their journey’s to finding better health and happiness for themselves.

SO MUCH of what we hate about ourselves is created right inside of our own minds. We may think that people see what we believe to be flaws. We feel insecure. We feel less than. But you know what? In reality, nobody sees your insecurities but you!

So here’s to STRONG WOMEN. We all come in different shapes and sizes and we are all beautiful in our own unique way. Remember that. ❤️”

 

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Lauren Fisher (@laurenfisher)

Lauren originally started CrossFit to improve her fitness for basketball, and is also an accomplished weightlifter. She won the 2014 USA Weightlifting Junior National Championship in the 63-kg class with a 70-kg. snatch (154.3 lb.) and a 102-kg clean and jerk (224.8 lb.), for a total of 177 kilos (390.2 lb.)

“Before: 15 Years Old 110lbs. After: 19 Years Old 135lbs. This was before I really started getting competitive in Crossfit and only went to class three times a week only for one hour! My main focus was sports like basketball and tennis. I wouldn’t be able to lift as much as I do now or compete versus all the top level CrossFit athletes if I didn’t put on the muscle. I don’t worry about my weight. The only time I step on the scale is to make sure I’m gaining and not losing any! This works for me and I am happy with being strong and fit! P.S. I think my 3RM Back Squat back then was only 145lbs…”

 

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Lauren Fisher (@laurenfisher)

 

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Lauren Fisher (@laurenfisher)

Amanda Barnhart Posts Important Message about Having Unrealistic Body Image Goals

Amanda Barnhart finished 7th at the 2019 CrossFit Games. She has continually risen from 272nd in 2017 to 27th last year. Despite an ankle injury, she put on an impressive display of fitness and determination in Madison this summer, exciting the crowds with her weightlifting abilities and brave performances across the board.

She regularly talks about body image, working to dispel many of the myths that social media propagates surrounding this topic. What do you think about her thoughts below?

“The Left pic was taken 2-3 weeks out from the 2019 crossfit games and right pic is from just the other day. I posted one of these last year and I wanted to post another one because I like to continue to be as transparent as possible with you guys. I know some of you will ask what’s your weight difference here? And I’m going to answer that by saying it doesn’t matter. I’m posting this to show THAT I AM HUMAN.”

“I am posting this to share with you that the “Perfect Crossfit Games body” is not sustainable and should NOT be your “goals.” Someone like me, who’s life literally revolves around exercise, should not be your goal.”

“I am here to keep it real, to inspire, and to motivate you all to focus on being the best YOU.”

“Life’s way too short to be constantly chasing “the perfect body.” And don’t get me wrong, having goals is GREAT but I encourage you all to focus on finding the balance between healthy and happy. And I encourage you all to remember to love yourself despite your insecurities and to please give yourself a little forgiveness when you aren’t perfect because trust me NO ONE is.”

 

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Amanda Barnhart (@amandajbarnhart)

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