16.1 Open Workout: Pace & Efficiency Wins the Race

So with the 16.1 Open Live Announcement over and Emily Abbott crowned the victor, it’s time for a recap, and a critique on what you can do to improve your first 2016 Open workout performance.

16.1 Open Workout

20 min AMRAP

  • Over head Walking Lunge 25 ft
  • Bar Facing Burpee x 8
  • Over head Walking Lunge 25 ft
  • Chest to Bar Pull Ups x 8
  • Weight: Men 43 kg  / 95 lb. Women 29kg / 65 lb

Scaled Version (replace the appropriate exercises with the following)

  • Men 20 kg  / 45 lb. Women 35 kg  / 35lb
  • Front Rack Walking Lunge
  • Jumping Chin over Bar Pull Ups x 8

The two athletes went into the event with the following stats:

CHYNA CHO

  • 2015 Games  6th
  • 2015 Reg 3rd
  • 2015 Open 31st

EMILY ABBOTT

  • 2015 Games 8th
  • 2015 Reg 1st
  • 2015 Open 48th

HOW THE ATHLETES PERFORMED

Both athletes were neck and neck at the half way mark, and it was only until around 17 minutes that Emily Abbott began to take the lead. It soon became clear that this workout is all about finding the right pace, and she showed no signs of slowing down. The Canadian pulled ahead and slowly broke away until the very end of the event. The final score cards read:

  • Chyna Cho 279 reps
  • Emily Abbott 290 reps

NOW IT’S YOUR TURN

After watching the event and listening to the athletes analyse their own personal performances, here are the tips and techniques that rose to the surface. Use them to help you in your own workout in order achieve the best possible time for yourself.

1 PACE YOURSELF

The workout is a 20 minute AMRAP, so make sure that you set a steady pace. The numbers, weights and distances aren’t too high, but don’t be fooled by that. During the debrief Chyna Cho mentioned that she had set off slightly too fast, and ultimately she was unable to keep up with Emily Abbott’s steady and consistent pace. Make sure that you keep to a pace that you can maintain.

2 BAR FACING BURPEE TECHNIQUE

If you watch the event, you will notice a difference in style between Abbott and Cho. Cho lands with her feet together and hops over the bar before dropping down to complete her next rep. Look closely at Abbott’s footwork and you will notice that she brings one foot further forward, enabling her to power up from the ground into the jump. This is only a small difference, but over the course of 20 minutes, this effective method will save you both time and energy.

3 RESTING & BREATHING

Chyna Cho: ‘you have no reason to rest’

This is a workout that requires efficiency because of its duration. In order to maintain your momentum, you need to make sure that you complete each set of lunges in one go. Abbott mentioned that she used the lunges as a breathing space by locking out her arms (provided that you feel confident with the weight). Stay calm throughout, and concentrate on your breathing, especially during the chest-to-bars.

4 COPING WITH FATIGUE

Another technique is to break the Chest to Bar reps down into more manageable sets of 4 or 2 if you start to struggle (I would say tired, but we all know that state is inevitable!).


Featured Image

©Cho: Pinterest

©Abbott: Blonyx

Instagram Media

©Emily Abbott

©Chyna Cho

 

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About The Author

Editor-In-Chief at BOXROX. I come from a background of rugby and weightlifting. Growing up in the English Lake District, I spent a great deal of time swimming in its stunning lakes and rivers. In 2015 my brothers and I became the first people to swim the 145km length of the River Eden, from source to mouth, in 9 days. We also swam the Corryvreckan whirlpool, the third largest in the world, and Crossfit is a huge part of my training for these events.

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