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How To Build Powerful Lower Abs With Decline Leg Raises

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Find out how to build powerful lower abs with decline leg raises.

The abs are one of the most desired muscles people want to strengthen and make leaner. Sadly, it is also one of the hardest places to do so. That is because the abdomen is usually one of the last regions in our bodies that tend to lose fat.

The more body fat you have, the less likely you are going to see your abs. Some people tend to have incredibly strong core muscles, but still cannot see them – you can blame it on the body fat percentage.

14 Tricks On How To Lose Belly Fat Effortlessly

why you cannot lose stubborn fatSource: Anna Tarazevich on Pexels

That is why you need to lower your body fat percentage if you want to be able to see your abs. However, if you are already there or you just want to strengthen your midline, then this is for you.

The step-by-step guide on how to build powerful lower abs with decline leg raises was shared by John Meadows“The Mountain Dog” was a professional bodybuilder, trainer and nutritionist who died in 2021.

How To Build Powerful Lower Abs With Decline Leg Raises

So, how to build powerful lower abs with decline leg raises? Technically the abs are not divided into sections, but it is possible to target one area more than others depending on how you move your body.

how to build powerful lower abs with decline leg raisesSource: Karl Solano on Pexels
How to build powerful lower abs with decline leg raises

Any kind of leg raises will primarily target your lower abs. By utilising a decline bench, you are forcing tension for longer on your abs, making the exercise a bit more efficient.

To understand how to build powerful lower abs with decline leg raises, click on the video below by John Meadows and see the step-by-step of what to do and what not to do.

VIDEO – How To Build Powerful Lower Abs With Decline Leg Raises

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Muscles of the core and abs

Now that you know how to build powerful lower abs with decline leg raises, it could be useful to understand the muscles of your core and abs.

The superficial muscles are responsible for the movement of the skin and soft tissue, while the deep muscles are responsible for movements of bones and joints. The core is composed of several groups of deep muscles that connect to each other in layers around an axis known as the spinal column.

Deep muscles

The deep muscles of the core, including the transverse abdominis, internal and external obliques, perform movements of the spine, hips and legs. The deep muscles rotate your trunk in a corset-like fashion around your spine. They also help to stabilize your pelvis during everyday activities such as lifting objects or standing upright. These muscles are also responsible for bending at the hips (flexion) and knees (extension), moving limbs in opposition to one another such as with arm raises or leg kicks when swimming freestyle.

Rectus abdominis

The rectus abdominis is the muscle that you can see. It is a long flat muscle that runs vertically down the front of your abdomen, from your chest to pubic bone. Its primary function is flexing the spine and trunk, with secondary functions including bending forward, backward and sideways.

Annie-and-Her-AbsSource: Deposit Photos / CrossFit Inc

Internal obliques

The internal obliques are located on the side of your abdomen, and they help you to rotate your spine. They are also responsible for flexion, lateral flexion and rotation of the trunk.

A strong core is important for many sports such as golf or tennis because it helps you maintain good posture when hitting a ball or swinging a club.

External obliques

The external obliques are another set of muscles that help to give your body shape. They’re responsible for rotation of the spine and trunk, lateral flexion (side bends), and also assist in breathing. These are some serious multitaskers!

Muscles of the Pelvis

Mainly, understanding how to build powerful lower abs with decline leg raises, these are the muscles you will be targeting.

The muscles of the pelvis are divided into two groups: lateral and medial. The lateral group includes the pubo-rectalis muscle and levator ani muscle, which both help maintain control over bodily waste products. This can be useful for men who want to improve their prostate health or women who are trying to avoid incontinence.

The pubo-rectalis muscle is a thin, flat tendon that connects the front part of your pubic bone to your rectum—that’s why it’s also called the puborectalis muscle. It helps you keep things nice and tight down there by contracting when you need it to do so; this helps prevent fecal matter from leaking out when you cough or sneeze (or laugh).

The levator ani runs between two bones in your pelvis: Your coccyx (tailbone) and sacrum (the triangular bone at the bottom of your spine). It also connects with your pelvic floor muscles via tendons at either side of each leg opening.

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Find out how to build powerful lower abs with decline leg raises

These muscles are responsible for movements of the spine, hips and legs.

The muscles of the core and abs are responsible for movements of the spine, hips and legs. They also help with posture, stability and breathing. Core muscles include all of your stomach muscles – your external obliques (the ones you can feel when you suck in), rectus abdominis (the six-pack muscles) and transverse abdominis (underneath them). Abdominal exercises include crunches, sit-ups or planks.

Conclusion – How To Build Powerful Lower Abs with Decline Leg Raises

The core muscles are important because they work with your other muscles to keep your body balanced and in alignment. When you do exercises that strengthen these muscles, you’ll be able to do more activities without pain or strain.

For example, if you have lower back pain from sitting at desks all day long, strengthening these muscles will help alleviate some of that discomfort.

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